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The Word Journeys Book Blow-Out Sale: 9 Titles from Robert Yehling

This is one of my favorite times of the year. Kids are in school, visitors have left Southern California, the ocean and sun are warm… and tis the season for writing and writers conference.

On Oct. 2, Crawl of Fame, the memoir I co-wrote with Ironman Triathlon Hall of Famer and lifelong friend Julie Moss, releases to bookstores and online booksellers throughout North America. Published by Pegasus Books, Crawl of Fame is the remarkable story of a young woman’s unlikely crawl to instant fame, how her courageous performance at the 1982 Ironman elevated triathlon to world sport status, and how she’s empowered women and men, girls and boys since.

To celebrate the release of Crawl of Fame, welcome to the Word Journeys Fall Book Blow-Out! The perfect time to grab new reads for yourself, and load up on holiday gifts for others. Between now and October 15, we’re offering substantial buy-direct discounts on nine backlist titles, signed and inscribed by me as you’d like.

How the sale works:

  • Choose your book(s), contact us (bobyehling@gmail.com or through WordPress) and pay via check (made to Word Journeys, Inc., sent to 2517 Via Naranja, Carlsbad, CA 92010) or PayPal (at the above email address).
  • Indicate if you’d like your book(s) signed.
  • We’ll ship immediately. Expect your book within 5-7 days of order.
  • If you buy 3 or more books, take an additional 10% off the sales prices.
  • Add $3 to ship 1 book, $5 for 2-3 books, and $7 for 4 or more books.
  • Enjoy your bounty!

Here are the titles:

Voices: The novel about rock music legend Tom Timoreaux, his rising star daughter — and emergence of his lost love-child, set to the backbeat of the past 50 years of rock and roll. Nominated for the Independent Publishers Book Award. 5-star ratings from Amazon. Regular price: $18.95. Sale: $12.00

Just Add Water: Biography of superstar surfer Clay Marzo, who lives with autism. Clay’s inspirational story of becoming one of the world’s greatest surfers, was a finalist for the Dollie Gray Literature Award. Regular price: $16.95. Sale: $12.00

When We Were The Boys: The memoir of rock star, singer-songwriter-guitarist and award-winning film producer Stevie Salas. This coming-of-age story focuses on Stevie’s turn as Rod Stewart’s lead guitarist on the 1988 Out of Order Tour — and how it launched his great career. Regular price: $17.95. Sale: $12.00.

Beyond ADHD: Written with Canadian ADHD expert Jeff Emmerson, Beyond ADHD looks at the many deeper causes of our diminishing attention span, the current rush to diagnose as ADHD and treat it with powerful drugs — and numerous ways to change lifestyles and embrace attention-growing attitudes and activities. Endorsed by Dr. Allen Frances, mental and behavioral health expert and chair of the DSM-IV committee. Hardcover. Regular price: $35.00. Sale: $25.00

Writes of Life: Using Personal Experiences in Everything You Write: Winner of the Independent Publishers Book Award, this book is for writers, students, educators, and anyone using their own stories in essays, journals, fiction, memoir, poetry… anything you write. Features 80 exercises. Regular price: $12.95. Sale: $10.00

The Write Time: 366 Exercises to Fulfill Your Writing Life: “The best writing exercise book on the market,” Poets & Writers said. Every day, a new exercise to stretch your writing muscles, explore new genres, and refine your skills. For authors, journalists, casual writers, educators and students alike. Features motivational quotes from authors and much more. Regular price: $16.95. Sale: $12.00

For lovers of poetry, lyric and essay, we also bring three poetry-essay titles: Shades of Green, Coyotes in Broad Daylight, and Backroad Melodies. All feature more than 60 new poems and essays, with elements of love, nature, relationship, ecology, music, the deep woods and the open road. More than 30 of my poems also appeared in journals. Regular price for each: $12.00. Sale: $10.00

 

 

 

We invite you to jump in, get some holiday shopping done early, find something for yourself to read and enjoy, and indulge in the Word Journeys Book Blow-Out !

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Bill McKibben’s Eaarth Message: It’s Time To Act

(This is the first of a two-part series on New York Times bestselling author-activist Bill McKibben’s visit April 17 to Nevada County, CA and to Ananda College, where I teach. In Part 1, we look at McKibben’s message to spread the disturbing news that global warming is not only accelerating — but that its terrifying offspring, wholesale climate change, has been born.)

I was an environmental activist in the 1980s and early 1990s. I marched, fought for forest preservation from Reagan-era logging of redwoods and Douglas firs, participated in clean ocean campaigns, quit eating meat for environmental and health reasons, wrote many articles, and absorbed the vital works of Gary Snyder, Wendell Berry, Edward Abbey, Terry Tempest Williams and others. I also performed public relations work for EarthSave, the group founded by Baskin-Robbins ice cream heir John Robbins to confront the unhealthy, dangerous way food is mass produced — particularly in the meat and poultry industries. Want to know why Wendy’s, McDonald’s and others stopped cutting down Amazon rainforests to graze their hamburger cows? Or why free range meat, raw milk, organic produce and farmers’ markets – the ways of every generation up to those born post-FDR – started to regain a foothold in this country? Thank EarthSave, in part. We made a difference.

During this time, in 1989, a young East Coast writer with as much fire in his belly and anger over the nation’s fossil fuel and agribusiness approach as me — far more, as it turned out — wrote the first book on global warming. In The End of Nature, Bill McKibben warned of the consequences if we didn’t take major steps to slow our fossil fuel consumption and reduce our carbon footprint. That book launched McKibben on a lifelong mission with his pen to call attention to the slippery slope on which we were sliding, away from a perfectly balanced atmosphere and environment that has hosted civilization for the past 10,000 years, and toward an abyss we are now seeing through the tremendous storms, droughts and earthquakes of the past few years.

How have we done? Well, let me put it this way: While talking briefly on Tuesday with McKibben, a bestselling author and the world’s foremost environmental journalist, I brought up his latest book, Eaarth. The front half of this book reads like the movie script of The Day After Tomorrow — only it’s all true and scientifically verified. I said to him, “It’s really a shame you had to write Eaarth. I felt like I was reading the worst-case scenario of everything we were warning people against 25 years ago … and they just blew us off.”

Welcome to the way it is. Or, as McKibben says, “The Earth we live on now is not the same planet that has sustained civilization for the past 10,000 years.” On Tuesday night, at a sold-out gathering at Miners Foundry in Nevada City, Calif. that included his host and mentor, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet/essayist Gary Snyder, and California Gov. Jerry Brown, he put it another way while receiving a warm welcoming applause: “It’s a great pleasure to be here. Probably greater for me than it is for you after what I’m going to tell you.”

McKibben was brought to the area by Ananda College and the Yuba Watershed Institute, which co-sponsored the special evening. The main forces, who deserve great credit for organizing McKibben’s visit, are Nischala and Nakula Cryer of Ananda College, and Gary Snyder.

Earlier that day, before students and faculty at forested, bucolic Ananda College, McKibben also had a few things to say. I’m going to spend the rest of this blog sharing a few of his comments and insights, and then devote the next blog to his organization, 350.org, and steps we can take collectively moving forward.

Four things struck me about McKibben: He is a gentle, thoughtful, caring man with a wry sense of humor to go along with one of the most serious messages anyone has ever delivered on this planet. He is extremely dedicated to what he is doing; he has been home very little in the past five years, going from Bangladesh to China, Europe to all pockets of the U.S., to call us into action to save ourselves. He is humble and unpretentious, absent of arrogance. He is a Harvard graduate and Sunday school teacher who lives in a rural Vermont community, not the sort of person the media and a certain political element would associate with “environmentalist.” In fact, if ever there was a man more reluctant to step into the ring and take up the fight …

But fight he is, delivering the most important message in the world, in my opinion: because his message is the present and future of this world. Talk about the ultimate purpose for an award-winning journalist and writer to undertake!

Here is the message, boiled down to five basic premises:

1) Global warming. This is not, as Rick Santorum tells us from the depths of the sand, where his head is buried,  “made up by scientists.” Nor is it just getting underway. It is game on. The planet’s temperature has risen 1 degree, with more increase expected. With each degree of change, the world’s grain harvests reduce by 10%. In a world where the population is now 7 billion and expected to max out at 9 billion mid-century, that’s a scary proposition. In fact, as McKibben notes, the words “global warming” are becoming passé. It’s time to wrap our brains around a new term: “climate change.”

2) Climate change isn’t the clarion call of future doomsayers. We are changing, right now. “It’s happening much faster and much harder than we would have thought,” McKibben explained. “We have 40% less summer ice in the Arctic than we did when most of us were in school, when kids like me saw the Apollo 8 ‘Earthrise’ photo, and the oceans are 30% more acidic. Just in the last two years, we had extreme floods in Pakistan, where 20 million lost their homes, the tornado outbreaks in the Midwest and South that killed hundreds, and the drought in Texas, which killed half a billion trees. Plus, in my home area, Hurricane Irene dumped more rainfall in one day than any other day in the 250 years we’ve been keeping weather records in Vermont — and broke the all-time record not by a millimeter, but by 25 or 30 percent.

“This is the exact thing climatologists said would happen if the earth warmed up — and now it’s warmed up by 1 degree because of human consumption.”

Apocalyptic fires. Droughts that kill 500 million trees. Diseases like mosquito-borne dengue fever that kill thousands. Pine bark beetle infestations that wipe out tens of millions of trees in the Rockies. Floods that put 20% of entire countries underwater and break 250-year-old records. Earthquakes growing bigger and meaner (In early April, one year after the cataclysmic earthquake in Northern Japan, there were two 8-point quakes in Indonesia and a 7-point quake in Mexico — on the same day). Tornadoes not forming in isolated cells, but by the hundreds. Rain measured not in inches per season or month, but by the hour. Fifteen thousand high temperature records broken in U.S. cities and towns in March – as part of the warmest global winter in history.

Welcome to our new climate. And the really scary part? “It is very important to remember that this is just the beginning of climate change,” McKibben said.

3) When the carbon dioxide concentration in the global atmosphere reaches 350 parts per million, according to the world’s top climatologist, NASA’s Jim Hanson, we will permanently alter the atmosphere that created the life forms and civilizations into which we were born. Guess what? Will is now: the current concentration is 393 ppm, and rising two ppm per year. “We’ve taken hundreds of millions of years of biology buried under the earth — plankton, plant life, dinosaurs — and spewed it into the atmosphere, most especially in the past few decades,” McKibben said. “That’s what’s causing the problem. It’s effects show in a matter of days as extreme weather events, but also over a little bit slower pace, such as the steady rise of sea levels.”

The 350 number is what McKibben and seven Middlebury (VT) College students took in 2008 as the name for their organization to call attention to global climate change and act on it: 350.org. Citizens of every country except North Korea actively participate; in fact, in 2009, they led a total of 5,100 demonstrations in 181 countries, what CNN later described as greatest single political action ever taken in the planet’s history. Much more on this vital work in the next blog.

4) Hydrology. This is the scientific study of how water moves through the atmosphere. The math is simple: the warmer the air, the more water evaporates and populates the atmosphere. After seven days, it has to come down — and it’s coming down, hard. “We’ve loaded the dice for droughts and floods, and we’re seeing both in epic proportion,” McKibben said.

5) It’s Time to Act. If we don’t act on a global as well as individual and community level, bad will become catastrophic. It already is, in many countries. Deniability is not an option; the science is irrefutable. As McKibben puts it, “Some of our greatest support comes from third-world countries and places like Pakistan. They get it. They’ve been swept out of their homes.”

In every sinister story — and unfortunately, we’re all participants in this sinister story right now, entitled “Survivability and Sustainability” — there is a culprit or an antagonist. McKibben minces no words in identifying that antagonist, the one industry that has single-handedly altered the course of the planet — the fossil fuel industry. “While scientists have been warning politicians in one ear, the fossil fuel industry has been bellowing in the other. Their 20-year effort to make sure absolutely nothing changes has been very successful. It’s hard to go up against them; last year, Exxon made the largest profit in the history of money.”

In this part of the discussion, he brought out some good news — temporary though it may prove to be. McKibben and 350.org undertook massive action to stop the entire Keystone Pipeline from being built. They won their fight by two Senate votes last November — but only after enormous activism and education, a few nights in jail for civil disobedience, and forming a five-deep human ring around the mile-long perimeter of the White House — with people carrying signs that contained President Obama’s own words from the 2008 campaign, a reminder of what he said he would do to protect the environment and fight climate change.

At issue? The oil beneath the tar sands of Northern Alberta, Canada. When McKibben discusses it, a horizon of realization opens up that you won’t find in any of the countless TV commercials Exxon, BP and the others are airing. “The tar sands hold the second largest pool of carbon on earth. Only Saudi Arabia’s oil fields are bigger. If you take the damage the gold rush people did to the mountains in the Sierra Nevada foothills (in the late 19th century), and multiply it by maybe a billion, you will see the incredible amount of earth they’ve moved to get to maybe 3% of Alberta’s available oil. The amount of earth moved is more than the combination of what it took to build the Great Wall of China, the Suez Canal and the 10 largest dam projects on earth. If you don’t believe me, go to Google Maps. It looks like a giant scar on the face of the planet — and it costs more in orders of magnitude than the oil is worth.”

That led to one of McKibben’s most provocative comments — one that rolls right into my long-held disdain for this country’s ridiculous “liberal” vs. “conservative” labeling of divisive dialogue. If only people would look at the etymological roots of these words, see what they really mean, and examine their lives … well, that’s another subject. Which is why I loved the way McKibben used words like “extremist” and “radical,” a way that might surprise you:

“If you really think about it, the true radicals are those who work at oil companies and make the decisions to keep drilling and drilling some more. If you’re willing — and eager — to get up every day and change the chemical composition of the environment in a way that is extremely harmful to your fellow human beings, that’s never been done to a civilization, then you’re a radical.”

As for where I stand? This blog is my first action in awhile outside my own lifestyle, community interests, and poems and essays. I’m back in the ring. This planet and its people are far too important to waste — and that’s what is happening. Thank you, Bill McKibben, for reigniting the fire.

(NEXT: More from Bill McKibben’s talks, a closer look at 350.org and future community building, and what you and I can do, right now, to help slow down climate change).

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10 Random Thoughts About Writing

While watching snow fall the other day in mid-April in the Sierra Nevada foothills — what some would call a highly unusual occurrence, what I would call part-and-parcel of the new climate in which we live —  a few random thoughts about writing, writers and our love of putting feelings, thoughts and observations to words:

1)   With the Boston Marathon’s latest running Monday (an event I’m proud to say I have raced three times), I always think of the similarities between running a marathon and writing a book. Both are long processes that we start with tremendous expectation and energy – sometimes, too much energy. How many potentially good books have fizzled out because we put everything we had into them in the beginning, only to burn out? Runners who started their marathons too fast can answer that question. How do runners deal with those middle miles, the 10- through 20-mile marks, after their initial adrenalin wears off and they need to push forward and conserve energy at the same time? Writers can let them know; it’s called the middle chapters.

And finally, how do you tie up the loose ends and conflicts in your narrative, and bring the book to its conclusion? Ask any marathoner who has successfully covered the final 10K of the 26.2-mile race; some even say “the race begins at 20 miles.” I agree: for running and for books. No matter how tired we are, how sick we are of the material, we have to summon our deepest reserves of creativity and energy, focus even more intently, and write or run to that finish line — well.

2)   In 1987, when Guns N’ Roses burst onto the national scene as the best American rock band since Aerosmith (and, some would say, better), who would’ve thought that their tall, rangy, rowdy bass player would evolve into a fine, evocative writer? Yep, you’re right: I didn’t raise my hand, either. But sure enough, as G&R takes its long-deserved place in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, bass player and ESPN.com columnist Duff McKagan releases his memoir, It’s So Easy … and other lies. If you want to read a hard-hitting memoir about the rock music world and its excesses, actually written by the musician (and written well), grab this book. You will be delightfully surprised. Duff is one of the true success stories in rock music – as in, he successfully navigated some perilous waters to enjoy the life he now experiences with his wife and two daughters. The opening chapter alone is priceless — setting up his daughter’s 13th birthday party — and finding out he’s gone from rock star to “I want you to remain invisible from my friends.”

3)   There’s another Imagebook we need to read, not only because of its fine, incisive journalistic reporting with a crafty narrative non-fiction writer’s voice, but because of its pressing subject matter: Eaarth, by Bill McKibben. I’ve been reading articles and occasional books by McKibben since he wrote End of Nature in 1989, when I was doing some environment and food-based work for Earth Save. Eaarth is something quite different; it speaks of what has already happened to the planet from global warming and our addiction to fossil fuels, and what is coming. What struck me, through the tremendous writing and journalism, was not that McKibben was sounding the same warning call we’ve heard for years from others — but that the time is at hand. All you have to look at is the month of March: 15,000 high temperature records were set in the U.S. alone. Gas is $4 per gallon. What polar ice caps? I can’t wait to see him at Ananda College, where I teach, on Tuesday morning, and at his appearance with poet Gary Snyder Tuesday night in nearby Nevada City. As writers, we have the power to help create a more sustainable future with our hands, in more ways than one. This is a great and necessary read.

4)   The other day, I was talking to my advanced writing class about what really matters in education and in teaching the subject of writing. With so many great books on writing readily available at Whispernet speeds, it’s silly to constantly try to reinvent the wheel of material — though I can give it shot through two writing books of my own and 35 years of in-the-trenches journalistic, writing and editing experience. We hit upon two of my most near-and-dear perspectives on the teaching of writing, and of education at large:

a) The greatest task – and accomplishment – of all teachers is to instill a lifelong love of learning in their students, reinforced and expanded daily; and

b) Any good writing teacher meets the student at their present stage, takes them by the hand, and expands their horizon and possibility — and shows them how to continually take chances that tap the treasure of the truly insightful, innovative and meaningful. However we do it, that is our goal. Nothing less.

5)   I’m now wrapping up the novel that’s taken me forever to finish, Voice Lessons, about a rock music legend/legacy from the late 1960s whose reformed band becomes huge once again, in large part because of the protagonist’s daughter, a great young singer. In the midst, his other daughter, a love child lost to him in the early ‘70s, reappears in his life. This has been an incredible experience, as I wove through my characters through two quite separate but equally rich experiences — a fifty-year swath of American music and its deep-seated place in our culture; and what happens when relationships break … and then mend many years later. Will be shipping it off in a few weeks … look for it in 2013.

6)   Am getting ready to write a narrative nonfiction piece on the place where I teach college — the heart of California’s Gold Rush Country. What has struck me is that, from where I sit, there are four types of gold in these thar Sierra Nevada foothills: a) the gold that ignited the fever that changed this place, and America, forever (and there’s still plenty in the rivers and quartz veins); b) the inner gold, with some deep spiritual practices informing many residents and communities here; c) the intellectual gold, in this area where many scientists, educators and thinkers live simple, land-based lives; d) the literary gold, brought forth by numerous authors. Really going to have fun with this one.

7)   We’re having one of my favorite activities here at the college on May 8: our second literary night. If every elementary, middle and high school would have one or two of these nights per year, in which students read their writing to a receptive audience, then I feel more kids would get into writing. The written word comes alive when you put voice, emotion and presence to it, and nothing does that more than live readings. Four of my students will be using literary night for their oral final; that’s how important I feel it is. We’ll also have other readers from the student body and faculty. More than anything, we’ll celebrate our stories, poems and the beauty of writing itself.

8)   A fantastic writing book to pick up, if you want to work on diving deeper into the essence of your stories, characters, subjects and yourself: Ensouling Language, by Stephen Harrod Buhner. What a gem.

9)    If you haven’t already joined, welcome yourself into our Word Journeys — Resources for Writers group on Facebook. This is a great group: more than 400 authors, editors, publishers, publicists, agents and educators sharing their love of writing, along with a diverse array of traditional and digital publishing tips. Best part of this group? Since I know just how tough it is to market books, you can post your new releases in the group and give us links to them – as long as you don’t go advertising billboard on us! We’d love to see you there.

10) Finally, a challenge to all of you to literally write the spring: Write about green subjects, growth, expansion, spirit, community, friendship, love … all the subjects that cause mind and heart alike to expand in both depth and perspective. See if you can tap into the energy of the spring and write pieces that resonate with growth, promise and bounty. 

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