March Madness, in More Ways Than One

Now that the greatest sports tournament in the country, the NCAA’s March Madness basketball showdown, is underway, time to take a breather from what has truly been a mad March from the writing and editing desk.

Actually, count in February as well, especially since the Southern California Writer’s Conference. It turned out to be a major catalyst and motivator to a lot of people, me included. I’m overjoyed to see so many of the attendees taking the spirit and momentum of the conference to power forward with their novels and non-fiction books. Consequently, they are keeping editors and agents very busy right now.

So, a few tidbits from the writing world, about some friends, and also fun cultural happenings from my other creative loves, music and art.

Spent Saturday afternoon at Rock Your Loxx in Oceanside, a hair salon with a wonderful rock music motif and theme. The salon, owned by long-time vocalist and stylist Stephen Jerome, is filled with classic album covers, books, photographs of thirty years of stars, memorabilia and the like. Stephen’s supplies and scissors sit on a Marshall amp, there’s a drum kit in the corner, and the newest piece is an autographed guitar signed by rock star Stevie Salas, who is from Oceanside.

On Saturday, I (literally) ran down to Rock Your Loxx to find nearly a hundred people jamming

Robert Munger (R) presents an autographed Stevie Salas guitar to Rock Your Loxx owner Stephen Jerome during Saturday's promotion for artist Derek Riggs.

Robert Munger (R) presents an autographed Stevie Salas guitar to Rock Your Loxx owner Stephen Jerome during Saturday’s promotion for artist Derek Riggs.

into the salon and waiting in line outside to see Derek Riggs, a fabulous artist best known for his Iron Maiden covers. Whether or not you like heavy metal, Derek’s legacy is this: He is probably the last great album cover artist of a storied tradition that began with Rick Griffith, Wes Wilson and the psychedelic rock band covers of the 1960s. As we all know, albums went the way of dinosaurs in the late 1980s, replaced by CDs — which are headed in the same direction as collectible vinyl becomes all the rage. It was an awesome afternoon for a hair salon whose unique design is now catching the interest of the greater rock music world, and for a stylist who definitely personifies his salon.

During the day, Rock Your Loxx’s interior designer, my long-time friend Robert Munger, introduced me to one of my media heroes: legendary disk jockey Bob Buckmann, who turned up with his wife. After building a 100-watt pirate station in New York as a teenager, Bob made his name on WBAB-FM in Long Island, followed by WAXQ, known better as Q104.3. He headed to the West Coast, and became programming director for the greatest of all West Coast classic rock stations, KLOS. You Southern Californians, remember “The Seventh Day,” when KLOS DJs “Uncle” Joe Benson and Jim Ladd spun seven full albums on Sunday evenings? Bob had a hand in this and other programs in more recent years.

Now Bob is at KGB-FM in San Diego, offering up his 43 years of professional experience. What a thrill it was to meet him and talk with him about a mutual acquaintance and friend, Marty Balin of Jefferson Airplane, who I helped 10 years ago with his memoir, Full Flight. We agreed: Marty had one of the greatest voices to ever grace a rock stage. In fact, he inspired the titling of my novel, Voices, because in the 1960s, a helluva long time before a certain TV show grabbed the title, he was known as “The Voice”.

I know one thing: Stephen Jerome is all smiles today, which is his birthday. As Queen lead guitarist Brian May told me years ago on the American Idol set, where he was overseeing a week devoted to Queen, “The key to shaping a show is to hit ‘em over the head with the first two songs, then you can put whatever you want into the set.” Rock Your Loxx pulled off a great show.

• • •

I needed a good rocking break. It’s been crazy, with several clients getting ready (or already started with) the publishing rounds with fantastic novels, trilogies, memoirs and other goodies. In my 12 years as a book editor, I’ve never seen so many high quality manuscripts at the same time – and I’m hearing the same from other independent editors. The competition to publish traditionally is so fierce that writers are putting out their best work – early on. And I’m proud to say that my clients are writing highly publishable material.

Meantime, through my agent Dana Newman, I’m in the middle of publisher negotiations for works that I will share more with you when the good news comes. Yep, I’m superstitious. Seen too many “sure bet” deals slip through the cracks. But these look good, and when the contracts arrive, I’ll tell you all about them, who’s publishing them and where to find them next year.

• • •

Barbara Stahura and Ken Willingham

Barbara Stahura and Ken Willingham

A tip of the cap to my long-time friend, Barbara Stahura, who recently moved from Tucson to Southern Indiana. Barbara was the most versatile journalist with whom I worked when I was editorial director at Faircount International in Tampa, and also the person most responsible for hooking me up as a presenter/teacher at writer’s conferences.

Almost 10 years ago, Barbara’s husband, Ken Willingham, suffered a serious traumatic brain injury in a near-fatal motorcycle accident. She wrote about the experience in her 2008 memoir, What I Thought I Knew. She also wrote a workbook based on her time participating in Ken’s rehab, After Brain Injury: Telling Your Story, A Journaling Workbook, which is quickly becoming the standard-bearer for TBI writing therapy in a field that finally has the attention of the nation.

Today, Barbara is a national expert on TBI, particularly writing therapy, as well as a masterful journaling teacher. In a recent article in the Evansville Courier, she discusses the sudden change in her life, and the ensuing decade that has brought her to this front-in-center advocate’s position. What a great work and service, Barbara.

•  • •

Speaking of inspiration, stay tuned tomorrow and Wednesday for a two-part blog that will likely leave your jaw dropping. Let’s just say the subject, and the author, Martha Halda, are the closest things to me in this life. And soon, we’ll get to read all about it through her memoir, A Taste of Eternity.

That’s all the teasing for now. Back tomorrow. Write and read well today.

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1 Comment

Filed under Adult Literacy, Author Platform, Books, Creativity, E-books, Editing, Featured Websites, Fiction, Internet, Interviews, Journalism, literature, Memoir, Music, Online Media, Reading, travelogue, Uncategorized, workshops, writers conferences, Writing

One response to “March Madness, in More Ways Than One

  1. I am actually pleased to read this weblog posts which includes plenty
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